FEATURES

THE HONOR ROLL: Revolutionary War (1775-1783) by individual

Almost 60 members of the family can be documented as taking part in the Revolutionary War. Evidence is more than welcome if you know of other Parmelees, not listed below, who participated. This list has been compiled from records of the Daughters and Sons of the American Revolution, land grants, muster rolls, service records and pensions.

Note: Some of the remarks in the pension records do not correspond with history; bear in mind that these are the recollections taken 40 years or more after the war by old, sometimes infirm men.

More information will be added to each soldier's entry as time allows. I'd also like to post pictures of their tombstones; if you have a one, I'd appreciate a copy.

You can also browse by:
-- Battles

Loyalists

Those whose names are in red died during the war.

  • John ?-1782
    Private; of South Carolina
    Unplaced: There is a chance that he may not be a member of the family, as the entry is for "John Parmiler."
    He received 52 days' pay, from March 7 to April 27, 1782, for service in Col. Thomas Pearson's Little River Militia, which saw service through May 5 of that year, in South Carolina's 96 Brigade. He is listed as dead.

Patriots

Those names designated with a * have been recognized by the Daughters of the American Revolution.
Those whose names are in red died in the war.

  • Aaron 1757-1840
    Private; of Guilford, Conn., Richmond, Mass., and Weybridge and Colchester, Vt.
    [05-0289] (Aaron, Abraham, Isaac, John, John)
    He had three enlistments in Berkshire County, Mass., units. From April 26 to May 19, 1777, he was in Capt. Aaron Rowley's Company, which was called out by Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates and ordered to march to Saratoga, N.Y. Aug. 15 to 21, 1777, in Capt. Amos Rathbun's detachment of militia; and Nov. 5 to 7, 1780, in Capt. John Bacon's Company. His name is on a March 30, 1778, receipt roll for 40 shillings for service July 8-26, 1777, while in Rathbun's Company. He also won a contract to make 1,000 oars for New York forces in 1782. His brother
    Rufus also served. He was buried at Munson Cemetery, Colchester.
  • Abraham* 1717-1795
    Lieutenant; of Guilford and Goshen, Conn.
    [05-0168] (Abraham, Isaac, John, John)
    He was lauded by the DAR for "patriotic service" for answering the
    Alarm at Fair Haven on July 5, 1779, along with wife Mary (Stanley) Parmelee who was cited for making five blankets for soldiers. He was a member of the local train band and was buried at East Street Cemetery, Goshen. Son Theodore also served.
  • Abraham 1755-aft 1791
    Private; of Guilford, Conn., Richmond, Mass., and Canaan, N.Y
    [05-0273] (Silas, Abraham, Isaac, John, John)
    He enlisted June 30, 1777, in Capt. Aaron Rowley's Company, Col. John Brown's detachment of militia from Berkshire County, Mass., and was discharged July 26 at Saratoga, N.Y., after service at Ft. Ann. He was given mileage out and home, 210 miles. From Oct. 14 to 17, 1780, he was in Capt. Joseph Raymond's Company, Col. David Rossiter’s Regiment, Brig. Gen. John Fellows’ Brigade; which marched to reinforce Gen. John Stark's army at Stillwater, N.Y., on the alarm of Oct. 14.
  • Amos
    Private/corporal; of Berkshire County, Mass.
    Unplaced; this may be more than one man.
    An Amos enlisted for one year as a private May 8, 1776, in Capt.
    Jeremiah Parmele's Company, Col. Samuel Elmore's Regiment, which was raised in Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts. The regiment took to the field in July under Gen. Philip Schuyler and marched in late August from Albany into "Tryon County." During the rest of the year it was posted at Ft. Stanwix [later Ft. Schuyler], after which it broke up in the spring of 1777, with most of the men reentered the Continental service in the three states' lines.

    An Amos is listed as a private in Capt. Aaron Rowley's Company, Col. Benjamin Simonds' Regiment, from April 26 to May 19, 1777, when the unit was called out by Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates and ordered to march to Saratoga, N.Y. He enlisted June 30, 1777, in Rowley's Company, Col. John Brown's detachment of militia, as a corporal, and was discharged July 21 near Ft. Ann after an Alarm at Ticonderoga, N.Y. He was given mileage out and home, 110 miles.

    An Amos also served as a private from Oct. 29 to Nov. 6, 1781, in Capt. Joseph Raymond's Company, Col. Caleb Hyde's Regiment, Gen. David Rossiter's Brigade, for an alarm at Stillwater, N.Y., receiving compensation for travel: 60 miles home.
  • Amos* 1734-1779
    Private/lieutenant; of Litchfield, Conn.
    [03-0074] (David, Joshua, John, John)
    On May 9, 1776, the Connecticut Colonial Assembly granted his petition for 14 pounds, 12 shillings, 1 penny for nursing son
    John, a soldier, in 1775. He was cited by the DAR for "patriotic service." Amos also served during the French & Indian War.
  • Amos 1750-1824
    Lieutenant; of Killingworth and Roxbury, Conn.
    [01-0119] (Nehemiah, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Served in Capt. Alex Waugh's company of the 17th Connecticut militia. On July 19, 1779, he was among troops that were sent on a 50-mile march to oppose British forces that were burning Fairfield and Norwalk, just a few days after the Alarms at New Haven and East Haven.
  • Amos 1756-1820
    Private; of Guilford, Conn.
    [05-0658] (William, Joseph, Isaac, John, John)
    Discharged Nov. 20, 1775, from Capt. Andrew Ward's 2nd Company in the Northern Department. He was also in Lt. Samuel Lee's Company, on an undated list of soldiers "to be stationed as a guard for the town of Guilford to beholden until Jan. 1, 1781." His brothers
    Nathaniel and William also served.
  • Asa 1758-1828
    Private; of Guilford, Conn., Richmond, Mass., Rhode Island and New York
    [05-0274] (Silas, Abraham, Isaac, John, John)
    Marched on the
    Lexington Alarm of April 19, 1775, as a member of Col. John Patterson's regiment of the Massachusetts militia. On an Aug. 1, 1775, muster roll of the same regiment at Charlestown, Mass. Name appears for a bounty coat on an Oct. 6, 1775, return list of Capt. David Noble's company. Also served in Capt. Aaron Rowley's company of the Berkshire County, Mass., militia from Sept. 6 to 25, 1777. His death, at age 69 in Watertown, N.Y., was announced in the Feb. 8, 1828, edition of the New York Spectator.
  • Asahel* 1743/44-1784
    Private; of Killingworth, Conn.
    [01-0106] (Lemuel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    He served in Capt. Bezeliel Bristol's Company of Connecticut militia at the
    Alarm at East Haven on July 5, 1779. One of his nephews, Giles, served as a substitute for him during part of his Revolutionary War service. He was buried at Killingworth's Union Cemetery.
  • Asaph* 1746-1834
    Sergeant; of Branford, Chatham, Bethlehem, Norfolk, Woodbury and Canaan, Conn.; Dover, N.H.; and Bristol,Vt.
    [03-0088] (Jonathan, Joshua, John, John)
    Although the DAR lists him as a private, he can be found as a sergeant in Capt. Elias Dunning's 5th Company in the 13th Regiment of the Connecticut Militia. He served from Aug. 12 to Sept. 30, 1776, in New York. In a March 19, 1777, payroll at Woodbury, Conn., he was paid 3 pounds, 16 shillings, 5 pence for that 1 month, 18 days of service, and, for 200 miles travel, 16 shillings, 8 pence. He was buried at the Village Cemetery at Starksboro, Vt.
  • Bani* 1757-1839
    Private; of Killingworth, Meriden, Wallingford and Middletown, Conn.
    [01-0143] (Eliab, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Enlisted in 1776 for seven months in the Connecticut Line, in Capt. Elisha Cook's company. In May, 1777, he served for a month in Capt. Job Wright's company as a substitute for his father Eliab. In the fall of 1777 he was drafted for a month's service in Capt. Samuel Gates' company. His name appears on a muster roll dated Aug. 29, 1778, in Capt. Josiah Baldwin's Company, Col. John Ely's Regiment. He served in Capt. Bezeliel Bristol's company of Connecticut militia at the
    Alarm at East Haven on July 5, 1779. He was drafted into Capt. Aaron Kelsey's company late in 1779 and served two months at Stratford. The following year he had a one-month tour of duty in Capt. Josiah Baldwin's company at Providence, R.I. In 1781 he was drafted into the Connecticut militia again, where he served under Ens. Thomas Francis at the Ensign Guard Station on the Killingworth [now Clinton] coast. Received a pension; his widow, Charity, also filed for a pension. They are buried at the Kelsey Cemetery off North Road at Cromwell, Conn.
  • Benjamin 1735-ca 1793
    Lieutenant colonel; of Branford, Conn., and Hyde County, N.C.
    [03-0064] (Timothy, Joshua, John, John)
    Appointed lieutenant colonel of the Hyde County company by the North Carolina Provincial Congress on Sept. 9, 1775.
  • Bryan 1732-1817
    Private; of Middletown and Chatham, Conn.
    [03-0082] (Jonathan, Joshua, John, John)
    A member of the 9th Company alarm list at Chatham [now East Hampton]. He was buried at East Hampton's Lake View Cemetery.
  • Charles 1753-1838
    Private; of Durham, Conn., West Stockbridge, Mass., and Cazenovia, N.Y
    [10-0067] (Hezekiah, Joel, John, John)
    He marched for the relief of Boston after the
    Lexington Alarm of April 19, 1775, getting as far as Pomfret, Conn., before learning of the British retreat, for seven days' service. Pension papers state that he enlisted in New Haven in May, 1775, as a private in a Capt. James Arnold's Company, Col. David Wooster's Regiment. He was drafted in July, 1776, into Capt. Joseph Heacock's Company for two months. That unit was among those posted to guard New York City until British forces from Boston threatened. He was involved in the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, N.Y., on Aug. 28-30, 1776, at which he saw Gen. George Washington. Following the American evacuation, his company went to Turtle Bay, then Kings Bridge, where he was stationed until his term expired, mostly engaged in erecting fortifications around New York City. In September, he was sick with "camp distempre" at Harlem, spending some time in a hospital before being furloughed home to recuperate. He also was called into service during the British Raid on Danbury on April 26, 1777, and said he twice reported to New Haven when the enemy threatened it. In November, 1776, he was again drafted for two months and posted at Rye, Mamaroneck and New Rochelle, N.Y., to erect defensive fortifications. In September, 1777, he served a two-month enlistment in a militia unit under George Parsons, Col. Henry Knox's Regiment, at Fishkill and Peekskill, N.Y., was present when British Gen. John Burgoyne surrendered Oct. 17, 1777, and followed retreat British troops that burned Kingston. He stayed at Kings Ferry until his term expired. His occupation was a joiner. His father, Hezekiah, and brothers Moses and Simeon also served.
  • Constant* 1761-1843
    Private and drummer; of Durham and Killingworth, Conn.
    [05-0707] (Phineas, Isaac, Isaac, John, John)
    Enlisted May 26, 1777, a week after his 16th birthday for a three-year stint. In Capt. Aaron Stevens' company, Col. Heman Swift's 7th Regiment, Connecticut. He was ill a great portion of the time -- from June 1778 to September 1779, according to muster roll and pay records. Those records show he was in Pennsylvania: at Yellow Springs [Chester Springs] from April through September, 1778; New Milford in October, 1778; and Camp Reading from November, 1778, through March 1779. He then moved to New York: at Crown Point in April 1779; Highland in May 1779, and Camp Nelson Point, from June through September, 1779. He was also sick March, 1880, at Killingworth. Most months he was paid 2 pounds; that was raised to 2 pounds, 4 shillings and 5 pounds, 4 shillings toward the end of his stint. Became a drummer on March 1, 1779. Discharged May 26, 1780, at Springfield, N.J.. Applied for a bounty land warrant pension on April 18, 1818, at Killingworth with a life estate worth $270.11; his widow, Hannah, applied for a pension on March 28, 1855. Brothers
    James and Phineas and father Phineas also served. His occupation was shoemaker. He was buried at the Old Cemetery at Clinton [formerly Killingworth] behind the Congregational church.
  • Cornelius 1734-1820
    Private; of Killingworth, Conn.
    [01-0078] (Josiah, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Connecticut State Veterans Index at the state library lists him as a private during the war but I have yet to find any other documentation of his involvement. Killingworth town records indicate that he was a member of a 1779 committee set up to "provide for the soldiers of the Continental Army." He served in the
    French & Indian War. He was buried at Killingworth's Union Cemetery.
  • Eber 1750-1818
    private, of Guilford, Conn.
    [02-0055] (John, John, John, John, John)
    He appears on a roll for Capt. Shipman's Company dated Sept. 23, 1777. Brothers
    Joel, John and Reuben also served, as did his father, John. He was buried at Guilford's Nut Plains Cemetery.
  • Elias Harvey* 1752-1829
    Private; of Killingworth, Conn., and Leroy, N.Y
    [01-0132] (Ezra, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Served almost six months in 1775 in Capt. Samuel Gale's 8th Company in the 6th Regiment of Col. Samuel Holden Parsons. He enlisted May 11 and was discharged Dec. 19. On duty at New London, Conn., and Boston and Roxbury, Mass. Brothers
    Daniel, Ezra, Hiel and Samuel also served; their christening basin has been found. He was buried at Leroy's East Main Street Cemetery.
  • Ephraim ca1760-after 1825
    Private; of Wilkes County, N.C., and Livingston County, Ky.
    [01-3088] (Giles, Hiel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Served in the North Caroline line. His name appears on a list of soldiers Dec. 2, 1785, who were to receive military land warrants. He received 640 acres in Sumner County, Tenn., on Bledsoes Creek.
  • Ezra* 1745-1838
    Captain/2nd lieutenant; of Killingworth, Conn., and
    Newport, N.H.
    [01-0129] (Ezra, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Served as captain in a raid of volunteers. Also donated a yoke of cattle to hire a soldier to serve for him for a time in the Continental Army. A return dated March 15, 1776, shows that he served as a 2nd lieutenant in the 5th Company in Newport, the 16th Regiment of New Hampshire militia of Col. Benjamin Bellows Jr. He is on a payroll of Lt. Samuel Nichols Company in Bellows' regiment "which marched from Lempster and Newport, [N.H.,] on the alarm of June 29, 1777, to reinforce the garrison at Ticonderoga, [the
    Siege of Ft. Ticonderoga]." His unit got as far as the Connecticut River towns of Charlestown, N.H., and Bellows Falls, Vt., where they were detained. Bellows discharged the troops July 2, 1777, after learning that the Americans were evacuating. Ezra was paid 1 pound, 1 shilling, 7 pence for four days' service (at the rate of 8 pounds, 2 shillings per month) and officers' rations of 5 shillings, 4 pence for a total of 1 pound, 6 shillings, 1 penny. Brothers Daniel, Samuel, Elias and Hiel also served; their christening basin has been found. He was buried at Newport's Pine Street West Cemetery.
  • Gilbert 1764-1836
    Captain; of Killingworth, Conn., and Wilmington, Vt.
    [01-0200] (Jeremiah, Lemuel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    His company of foot soldiers saw duty north and east of New York City in 1776 under Maj. Sylvanus Graves and Col. Andrew Ward in the 7th Regiment of Connecticut Militia. He was present near Ft. Washington on Oct. 9 and 11, but was reported unfit for duty on Oct. 17 at Westchester and sick at Merrick. He was reported sick/absent at White Plains on Oct. 24 and at North Castle on Oct. 31 and Nov. 7. Brothers and
    Giles, James and John also served. He was buried at Wilmington's River View Cemetery.
  • Giles* 1762-1846
    Private; of Killingworth, Conn., Cambridge, Vt., and Potsdam, N.Y.
    [01-0199] (Jeremiah, Lemuel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    He enlisted as a substitute in October, 1778, for his uncle
    Asahel, who had been drafted for a three-month term to guard the coast along Long Island Sound. He is reported absent from Capt. Bezeliel Bristol's company of Connecticut militia at the Alarm at East Haven on July 5, 1779. He enlisted again, on June 27, 1780, in Capt. Aaron Stevens' company where he saw action along the Hudson River. He remained for two months at Orangetown, N.Y., and was a witness to the execution of Maj. John Andre, a British spy. Then he went to Fishkill, N.Y., where he accompanied prisoners down to Morristown, N.J. He was discharged Dec. 25, 1780. A payroll for July, 1780, shows he received $18 60/90, which included $10 for "subsistence." At Connecticut Hutts on May 2, 1781, he received $39 70/90 for serving five months, 29 days. He received a pension. Brothers Gilbert, James and John also served. He was buried at Potsdam's Bacon Cemetery.
  • Hezekiah* 1710/11-1796
    Patriotic service; of Durham, Conn.
    [10-0038] (Joel, John, John)
    Cited by the DAR for patriotic service. At least three of his sons --
    Simeon, Moses and Charles -- also served. He is buried at Durham's Old Cemetery.
  • Hezekiah* 1737-1794
    Private; of Guilford and New Haven, Conn.
    [08-0049] (Hezekiah, Job, John, John)
    Discharged Nov. 28, 1775, in the Northern Department as a member of the 9th Company of Capt. James Arnold under Gen. David Wooster. Many of the soldiers in this unit were furloughed or mustered out in October and November of 1775 due to widespread sickness. He, and his sister-in-law, Sarah, and a cousin,
    Jeremiah, filed for losses on May 10, 1792, for property destroyed by the British in the Alarms at East Haven and Fair Haven [part of New Haven].
  • Hiel 1755-1836
    Major, also a Minuteman; of Killingworth, Conn., and Springfield, N.Y.
    [01-0133] (Ezra, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Volunteered for duty on the
    Lexington Alarm in 1775 at Killingworth as a private in Capt. Aaron Stevens' Company, Col. Worthington's Regiment, and marched to Boston where he remained for three months with other militia units under Gen. Rufus Putnum. Drafted in March, 1776, as a corporal into a militia unit under Capt. Gale, Col. Worthington's Regiment, and marched to New York City where he remained for three months before going home. Drafted into the same unit that August, he marched to White Plains, N.Y., where he became ill toward the end of the year and was discharged. In September, 1777, he was drafted into a militia unit under Capt. Bristol, Col. Worthington's Regiment, and marched to Peekskill, N.Y., where he helped monitor shipping on the North [Hudson] River until his discharge. He served in Capt. Bezeliel Bristol's company of Connecticut militia at the Alarm at East Haven on July 5, 1779, and again two weeks later under Bristol during the British Raid on New London and at the taking of Ft. Griswold [Groton Hill] on Sept. 6, 1781. He served also as a Minuteman who helped watch the beach at Long Island Sound. Received a pension. Brothers Daniel, Samuel, Ezra and Elias also served; their christening basin has been found. He was buried at Springfield's Middle Village Cemetery.
  • Isaac ca 1755-aft 1800
    Private; of Essex County, N.J.
    [01-4750] (Hiel, Hiel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Listed on a Jan. 11, 1776, muster roll of Capt. Andrew McMyers' 6th Company, New Jersey's 1st Regiment, commanded by the Right Honorable, the Earl of Stirling, taken at Elizabethtown, N.J. It notes that he enlisted Nov. 13, 1775. Farmer, 5-foot-9 with dark complexion, dark eyes and dark hair. Received a 100-acre bounty land warrant for this, the location of which I have not determined; it was assigned to Joseph Halsey Jr. His service records show that he was in the Continental Army, in the 5th Troop, 2nd Regiment of Light Dragoons commanded by Col. Elisha Sheldon, enlisting Jan. 25, 1777, for the duration of the war. The document shows that he was 5-foot-9, with dark complexion, dark hair and dark eyes, a farmer from Westfield, N.J. He is listed as a private on an Oct. 5, 1778, return of Capt. John Sheather's 5th Troop; a private on a return of officer, noncommissioned and privates belonging to New Jersey now in the 2nd Regiment of Dragoons from Feb. 1, 1777, through Aug. 1, 1780; and a private from New Jersey on a book in the paymaster's office containing Sheather's Company, 2nd Regiment of Light Dragoons under Sheldon. His name is on muster rolls collected at
    Valley Forge. And he is listed on a "record from the contractors from New York and New Jersey, the number of 14 rations herein mentioned," dated Jan. 7, 1783, at Newburgh, N.Y.
  • Isaac 1759- ?
    Private; of Guilford, Conn.
    [05-0701] (Archelaus, Isaac, Isaac, John, John)
    On a Sept. 15, 1781, list of militia members under Lt.-Col. Samuel Canfield at West Point, N.Y.
  • James* 1757-1842
    Drummer/private; of Killingworth, Conn., Somerset, Vt., and South Bristol, N.Y.
    [01-0197] (Jeremiah, Lemuel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Drummer in Capt. John Mills' Company in the Connecticut Regiment of Foot commanded by Col. Charles Webb. He enlisted Jan. 10, 1777, and was discharged Jan. 10, 1780, completing his three-year term. James provided testimony for Nathan Thorpe's widow, Hannah, when she applied for a pension. James said that he and Thorpe had been at
    Morristown, N.J., and that became acquainted during the summer or fall preceding the "hard winter" of 1777-78. He and Thorpe lost contact after that and didn't see one another again until Thorpe moved into James' South Bristol neighborhood many years later. James appeared on muster rolls for June, July, August, and September through December 1777, with a notation that he was sick and absent in December from Valley Forge; for January (sick, absent), February, (on furlough), March, April, May, June, July (at White Plains, N.Y.), August (at White Plains, N.Y.), September (in the field), November (on command) and December 1778 (on command); for January, February (at Camp Redding, on command Feb. 26), March (on command Feb. 20), April (at Killingworth, Conn., on command), May (at Camp Highlands of York, transferred from the 9th Company), June (on command in Connecticut), July (at Camp Nelson Point, on command), August (at Camp Nelson Point), September (at Camp Nelson Point), October, November and December, 1779. His name appears on payrolls for July, August, September, October, November and December, 1777, at 2 pounds, 4 shillings per month; on payrolls for January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November and December, 1778, at the same rate (beginning in June soldiers were paid $7 1/3 which was 2 pounds, 4 shillings); on payrolls for March, May, June, July, August, September ,October, November (with an additional $10 subsistence for a total of 5 pounds, 4 shillings) and December at $7 1/3 (or 2 pounds, 4 shillings) per month. He was dismissed at Morristown, N.J., on Jan. 1, 1780. In his testimony May 14, 1818, in Ontario County Common Pleas Court for a bounty land warrant, he states that he was at the Battle of Monmouth, N.J. His widow, Lydia, applied for a pension. Brothers Gilbert, Giles and John also served. He was buried at South Bristol's Burby Hollow Cemetery.
  • James 1762-1846
    Private/Coast Guard/Minuteman; of Durham, Conn.
    [05-0708] (Phineas, Isaac, Isaac, John, John)
    His is the longest and most colorful pension application record. He was drafted for a month's Coast Guard service in May or June, 1778 or '79, to protect the beach at East Guilford [Madison]. During the
    Alarms on East Haven and Fair Haven, he responded, marching from Guilford toward New Haven. "At East Haven, on Beacon Hill, several of the enemy lie asleep under the shade of a tree with their bottles, biscuits and arms lying on the ground next to them. I had preceded my company with several others and arriving upon the group, we fired upon the enemy. They jumped up and hastily retreated and left their arms and other things upon the ground. I was the first one that seized one of their guns, which I brought away and have always kept it and hence it is in my house to this day. A canon ball came from the enemy at that time with took off the head of one soldier. The name of Pardee. Elnathan Norton, my neighbor, was wounded." According to a payroll statement, he joined for six months on June 26, 1780, serving in Capt. Stephen Hall's Company of Light Infantry, Col Heman Swift's Regiment. His unit marched west to Nelson Point [Nelsonville], N.Y., where "the captain of the company to which he was attached took a boatload of the said Parmly and the rest, across the river to West Point and where he saw two soldiers shot for desertion." His unit then marched south, crossing the Hudson River at King's Ferry into New Jersey, where he remained in winter quarters. He recalled being within about two miles of the execution of Maj. John Andre, a British spy, on Oct. 2, 1780, at Tappan, N.Y. He was transferred to the light infantry on Aug. 1, 1780. Muster rolls for August, September and October 1780 show that he enlisted for the duration of the war; muster rolls for November and December 1780 at North Redoubt show that he was on command at Stoney Point, N.Y. Due to be discharged Jan. 1, 1781, he was released a few weeks earlier, on Dec. 13. He was paid at Connecticut Hutts on May 2, 1781, a total of $34 for five months, three days' service, a rate of $6 60/90 per month. He was drafted in June or July, 1781, in Lt. Abram Scranton's Company, Col. James Arnold's Regiment, and went to Guilford where he served for three months under Simeon Parsons and was quartered in the home of Mrs. Griffing. At the time of this service, there was illicit trade carried on with the British off the Guilford coast. "We did duty at those several posts, including at the Point of Rock, Leets Island, Sachem's Head [parts of Guilford]. I remember while I was in service at this time, Corp. Simeon Coe, while at his post on duty on Leets Island, wishing to make it appear that the enemy had landed, pretended to fire at them and then cut off a hen's head and sprinkled the blood upon the rocks to induce us to believe the enemy had been wounded. A court-martial was held and he was acquitted for want of proof." He served as a Minuteman for a year under Capt. Hart, during which time "he was not allowed at any time to go from home but was at all times available and could be called on." He said that the day his duty was up, he went to Hartford for his pay but Lt. Pratt "offered me specie notes in payment and then offered to pay me hard money in lieu of a discount. I accordingly made the exchange but after I returned home I was told that the bills were equally good with the specie." His brothers Constant and Phineas and their father, Phineas, also served. He was buried at Durham's New Cemetery.
  • Jehiel 1752-1777
    Private; of Farmington and Litchfield, Conn.
    [03-0257] (Jehiel, Joshua, John, John)
    I believe he is the private listed as "Joshua Parmele" who is listed in Capt. Edward Rogers' Company, Brig. Gen. James Wadsworth's Regiment. His brother
    Joshua was a sergeant in the same unit. Brother Joel also served during the war. Jehiel was buried at Milton Cemetery, Litchfield.
  • Jeremiah* 1729/30-1797
    He may have been a private--questionable--of Killingworth, Conn., and Wilmington, Vt.
    [01-0101] (Lemuel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    Sons
    Gilbert, Giles, James and John served in the war. He was buried at Wilmington's River View Cemetery.
  • Jeremiah 1743/44-1778
    Captain; of New Haven, Conn.
    [08-0052] (Hezekiah, Job, John, John)
    Answered the
    Lexington Alarm on April 19, 1775, as a member of the 58-man 2nd Company Governor's Foot Guard under Capt. Benedict Arnold. (At the March 16, 1775, meeting in which Arnold was elected captain, Jeremiah was elected one of four sergeants.) On May 1 he was commissioned an ensign in the 1st Company, Col. David Wooster's Regiment. (Wooster also served as captain of that company.) These troops went to New York in late June and encamped at Harlem. Wooster and a small detachment guarded stock on Long Island that summer. In late September, the regiment marched north to take part in operations along Lakes George and Champlain. They assisted in the reduction of St. John's, Nova Scotia, in October and then were stationed at Montreal. In October and November, illness furloughed many of the soldiers. Jeremiah was discharged Dec. 20 and re-enlisted for service the following year. He was appointed captain of a company in Col. Samuel Elmore's Regiment on April 15, 1776, and service records show him in garrison at Ft. Schuyler [Ft. Stanwix] through Jan. 11, 1777. Elmore granted him 20 days furlough to New Haven on Dec. 1, 1776. Among the men in his company was Amos. The regiment took to the field in July under Gen. Philip Schuyler and marched in late August from Albany into Tryon County [later Montgomery County]. During the rest of the year it was posted at Ft. Stanwix [later Ft. Schulyer], after which it broke up in the spring of 1777, with most of the men reentered the Continental service in the New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts lines. Jeremiah was commissioned a captain in Col Moses Hazen's Regiment on Jan. 1, 1777. He was wounded in the Sept. 11, 1777, American defeat at Brandywine, near Chadds Ford, Pa., and died the following spring after contracting smallpox, on March 24, 1778. The ball by which he received his wound was in the possession of his dauther, Wealthy Beecher (1775-1863) for many years. He appears on a July 12, 1777, account of cash paid by Col. E. Antill, a $200 voucher for recruiting services, and also on a Jan. 1, 1778, muster roll. His widow, Sarah, brother Hezekiah and cousin Jeremiah filed for loses on May 10, 1792, for property destroyed in the Alarms at East Haven and Fair Haven [part of New Haven]. A list of officers' widows granted seven years' half-pay on file at the War Office and communicated to the House of Representatives on Feb. 21, 1793, shows that Sarah was due $1,680.
  • Jeremiah* 1736-aft 1820
    Private; of Guilford and New Haven, Conn., and Guildhall, Vt.
    [08-0058] (Abel, Job, John, John)
    He enlisted in Capt. William Munson's Company, Col. Moses Hazen's Regiment, on Jan. 26, 1781, at New Haven for three years. He appears on an undated account of clothing being delivered by Lt. Col. Smith in Ft. Mifflin to the soldiers under his command: one coat, one shirt, one pair of shoes and one pair of stockings. He was discharged on June 1, 1783, at Pompton, N.J. He applied for and received a pension, which was certified on Jan. 17, 1820, while living in Guildhall, Vt. When he testified in Essex County Court on April 7, 1818, he said that he participated at
    Yorktown, "in the battle of the taking of Lord Cornwallis in Virginia." He said that he was 73 (sic), unable to work, that he had no family and signed the document with his mark. A June 24, 1850, schedule of his possessions -- one swine, one pail, one small table, one small iron kettle, three earthen plates, one chest, two knives and forks and three spoons -- was valued at $5. His first payment, which brought him up to March 4, 1820, was for $183.45. He, his sister-in-law, Sarah, and a cousin, Hezekiah, filed for losses in the Alarms at East Haven and Fair Haven [part of New Haven].
  • Joel 1748-1829
    Private; of Killingworth, Conn., and West Stockbridge, Mass.
    [01-0118] (Nehemiah, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    His widow, Sarah, applied for a pension, appearing in Berkshire County, Mass., Probate Court on Aug. 1, 1843. One witness says that Joel "was buried on the day on which the new bell in the Congregational meeting house in said West Stockbridge was hung."
  • Joel* 1713-1788
    Coast Guard; of Durham, Conn.
    [10-0039] (Joel, John, John)
    He is listed in the DAR's Patriot Index as serving in the Coast Guard. He was the father of
    Joel. He was buried at Durham's Old Cemetery.
  • Joel 1757-1835
    Private, corporal and sergeant; of Guilford, Conn.
    [02-0056] (John, John, John, John, John)
    His name appears as a private on a 1776 payroll of Capt. Daniel Hand's Company, Col. Matthew Talcott's Regiment, from Guilford. The men were enlisted March 22 and assisted with defensive fortifications in New York and Brooklyn Heights before their April 18 discharge. A payroll shows he received 1 pound, 16 shillings. He enlisted July 1, 1776, in Capt. Aaron Stevens' 1st Company, Col. Samuel Mott's Battalion, and became a corporal. On an undated 1776 payroll he was paid 11 shillings, 1 penny for 10 weeks, two days' service; on another undated 1776 payroll, he was paid 6 pounds, 12 shillings for three months' service. He served as a sergeant in Capt. Bezeliel Bristol's company of Connecticut militia at the
    Alarm at East Haven on July 5, 1779. Brothers Eber, John and Reuben also served, as did his father, John. Late in the war he was charged with possessing illegal British goods. He was buried at Guilford's Nut Plains Cemetery.
  • Joel* 1758-1816
    Private; of Durham, Conn.
    [10-0080] (Joel, Joel, John, John)
    Served in Capt. Case's Company, Col. Thaddeus Cook's Regiment, part of the militia at Saratoga. He was the son of
    Joel. He was buried at Durham's Old Cemetery.
  • Joel 1761-1778
    Private; of Farmington and Litchfield, Conn.
    [03-0261] (Jehiel, Joshua, John, John)
    His name appears on a 1777 militia roster of Capt. Amos Barnes' Company, Col. Noadiah Hooker's Regiment which was raised out of the Farmington-Torrington area. He arrived at camp April 12 and was discharged, allowing five days to return, May 20. An undated 1777 payroll shows that he was paid 3 pounds, 2 shillings, 8 pence for serving one month, 17 days. Detachments from this brigade were placed on duty at various points in the Hudson Valley -- White Plains, Crompon, Fishkill, Ft. Montgomery, etc. A roll of Sgt. Aaron Bull's 3rd Troop, Col. Elisha Sheldon's Light Dragoons, shows that he enlisted in May, 1778, was 5-foot-6 with dark hair, dark eyes and dark complexion and was a farmer from Litchfield. It states that he was killed Oct. 30, 1778. That summer the regiment was on the Hudson River and in the fall formed part of Gen. Charles Scott's Light Corps on the lines in Westchester, N.Y. Also serving was his brother
    Joshua.
  • John* 1719-1799
    Private; of Guilford, Conn.
    [02-0048] (John, John, John, John)
    Sons
    Eber, Joel, John and Reuben also served. The DAR lists him as a private in the war, but I can find no service record for him. He was buried at Guilford's Nut Plains Cemetery.
  • John Gould 1743/44 -
    Questionable
    ; of Litchfield, Conn.
    [08-0127] (Thomas, Job, John, John)
    Some family histories have him confused with another
    John, who died aboard a prison ship, while others say he was wounded in battle, but that was his brother Thomas.
  • John* 1755-1828
    Private; of Killingworth, Conn., Somerset, Vt., and Sullivan, Ohio.
    [01-0196] (Jeremiah, Lemuel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    On a roll of Killingworth men who responded to the
    Lexington Alarm in 1775; eight days' service. He is a private on a Feb. 20, 1778, payroll of Lt. Samuel Nichols' Company in Col. Benjamin Bellows Jr.'s regiment, "which marched from Lempster and Newport [Vt.,] on the alarm of June 29, 1777, to reinforce the garrison at Ticonderoga, [the Siege of Ft. Ticonderoga]." His unit got as far as the Connecticut River towns of Charlestown, N.H., and Bellows Falls, Vt., where they were detained. Bellows discharged the troops July 2, 1777, after learning that the Americans were evacuating. John was paid for six days' service at a rate of 4 pounds, 1 shilling per month for wages of 18 shillings, plus travel of 1 pound, 6 shillings, 3 pence for a total of 1 pound, 6 shillings, 11 pence. His house still stands at the Killingworth-Chester town line. He was buried at South View Cemetery off U.S. 224 at Sullivan, Ohio. Brothers Gilbert, Giles and James also served.
  • John 1746-1840
    Express rider and drummer; of Guilford, Conn.
    [02-0053] (John, John, John, John, John)
    He served as a drummer in Capt. Aaron Stevens' Company, Col. Samuel Mott's Regiment, enlisting on June 22, 1776. On an undated 1776 payroll he received 7 pounds, 5 shillings, 1 penny for three months and nine days of service; on an undated 1776 sauce/payroll he was paid 13 shillings, 1 penny for 11 weeks and five days' service. He was a drummer in Capt. Bezeliel Bristol's Company, listed as one of those who went to the
    Alarm at East Haven on July 5, 1779. Brothers Eber, Joel and Reuben also served, as did his father, John. He was buried at Guilford's Nut Plains Cemetery.
  • John 1757-1777
    Private; of Litchfield, Conn.
    [03-0264] (Amos, David, Joshua, John, John)
    He served in Maj. David Welch's Company, Gen. David Wooster's Regiment, in the Northern Department along Lakes George and Champlain. Like many soldiers in the command who fell ill, he was mustered out, on Sept. 6, and sent home to Litchfield. His father,
    Amos, was compensated the following year by the Connecticut Colonial Assembly for medicine, physicians and other expenses. He and an uncle, Solomon, were both on a list of men in Col. Philip Burr Bradley's Regiment, Capt. Bezeliel Bebee's Company out of Litchfield who were taken prisoner when Ft. Washington fell to the enemy. He was held prisoner in New York City at Livingston's sugar house and died Jan. 15, 1777, at the North Church Prison. A Hartford pay journal table dated June 1, 1778, shows that his father, Amos, as next of kin, received 3 pounds, 9 shillings, 4 pence in prisoner wages.
  • John* 1762-1848
    Private and a Minuteman; of Elizabeth, N.J., Wilkes County, N.C., and Cumberland, Clinton, Russell and Wayne counties, Ky.
    [01-1919] (Giles, Hiel, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    He enlisted in 1778 for three months as a substitute for his father, Giles, in Capt. Larkin Cleaveland's Company, Col. Benjamin Cleaveland's Regiment. The unit marched to Ramsour's Mill to disperse an encampment of Tories, then to Hamblin's store in Burk County, and then to Wilkes Courthouse, where he was stationed until his term expired. He was discharged by Capt. Judd, who took command of the company after Capt. Clevealand was wounded on the Catawba River in an ambush on the march to Ramsour's Mill. He enlisted May 1, 1779, as a member of Montfort's Company and was discharged Dec. 1. In May, 1780, he volunteered for six months' service in Capt. John Morgan's Company, Col. Cleaveland's Regiment, and again was stationed at Wilkes Courthouse before joining up with other regiments for the march to the
    Battle of Kings Mountain. He was discharged at Hamblin's store, about five months after enlisting. He was drafted for three months into Capt. Paul Patrick's Company, Col. Elisha Isaac's Regiment, in June, 1780 [sic]. After a rendezvous at Hamblin's Store, they marched to and joined Gen. Rutherford's Brigade at Salisbury and joined the Continental Army under Gen. Horatio Gates. John's unit was involved in a skirmish at the mouth of Rocky River and then marched into South Carolina, where they took part in the Battle of Camden. Following Gates' defeat, John's company retreated to Salisbury, N.C., where Lt. Sewell took command of the company and marched the men back to Hamblin's store. There, Capt. Richard Allen took command and marched the men toward the head of the Dan River where they took several prisoners in a skirmish with Gen. Lord Charles Cornwallis' troops and Tories. Back to Wilkes Courthouse the company went, where again John was discharged. Again John became a substitute -- for Bunell Brewer -- for four months in Capt. Alexander Gorden's Company. That unit gathered at Hamblin's store and joined the regiment of Col. Charles Armand at Charlotte, N.C., and marched to Camden, S.C., where it joined Gen. Nathaniel Greene's army. The men were marched into the hills of the Santee River where they remained for some time. They returned to Camden, crossed the Congaree River and then marched south where they saw action at the Battle of Eutaw Springs, where he assisted in guarding prisoners outside of Salisbury, S.C. John filed for a pension on Aug. 6, 1834, and most of this account is from that document. He died in Clinton County, Ky., and was buried at the cemetery at New Bethel Church near Parnell, Ky.
  • Joseph 1738-1807
    Sergeant major; of Branford, Conn.
    Tentative [03-0065] (Timothy, Joshua, John, John)
    This man is referred to as "captain" in Branford records and yet I can find no service record for him. However, there was a Sgt. Maj. Joseph Pamelee on the payroll of Capt. Bezliel Bristol's Company, Col. Roger Newberry's Regiment of Militia dated Nov. 30, 1777, at New Windsor. It shows that he entered service Oct. 3 and was discharged Dec. 5, and was paid a total of 6 pounds, 8 shillings, 5 1/2 pence, which included 108 miles of travel. He was buried at Branford's Old Burying Ground.
  • Joseph
    Private; of Vermont
    Unplaced.
    His name appears on the April 3, 1781, payroll of Capt. Sage's Company that marched on orders of Gen. Bailey, Esq., of Windsor, Vt., on March 16, as part of Woods' Regiment of Vermont Militia. He received three days' pay, plus 42 miles, for a total of 18 pounds.
  • Joshua 1744-1780
    Ensign and sergeant; of Guilford, Kent and Cornwall, Conn.
    [03-0254] (Jehiel, Joshua, John, John)
    He appears as a sergeant on a 1776 roster of Capt. Edward Rogers' Company from Cornwall, Brig. Gen. James Wadsworth's Brigade. In this same company, there is another Joshua Parmelee, a private, listed; I wonder if this second man's name might have been misread as "
    Jehiel," Joshua's brother who died in 1777. His name also appears in an account of 1st Lt. Ambrose Sloper (Capt. Gad Stanley's 1st Company, Col. Fisher Gay's 2nd Battalion) for a 3 shillings, 3 pence debit on Dec. 16, 1776. His brother Joel also saw service. Joshua was buried at Cornwall's Calhoun (Crooked Esses) Cemetery.
  • Leumas 1758-1779
    of Guilford, Conn.
    [05-0195] (Samuel, Joseph, Isaac, John, John)
    His name appears on a June 11, 1776, payroll at New Haven for Capt. Daniel Hand's Company, Col. Mathew Talcott's Regiment. It shows he enlisted March 22 and was discharged April 18. For 25 days' service, he was paid 1 pound, 16 shillings.
  • Linus 1762-1825
    Private; of Guilford and Haddam, Conn.
    [05-0665] (Samuel, Joseph, Isaac, John, John)
    He received his brother
    Luther's bounty land in Ohio. He later served in the War of 1812.
  • Luther 1760-1785
    Private in regiment of artificers; of Guilford, Conn.
    [05-0664] (Samuel, Joseph, Isaac, John, John)
    Listed as a private on a return of Capt. Gamaliel Painter's Company, Col. Jeduthian Baldwin's Regiment of Artificers, who commenced service Feb. 9, 1778. He was on a return of Capt. Thomas Patterson's Company of artillery artificers dated June 4, 1783, at West Point, N.Y. Accounts for 1783 show he was paid $81.19 and an additional $80 in gratuities. His 100-acre Ohio Bounty Land Warrant, presented at the Treasury on April 26, 1810, by Nathaniel Frye, esq., went to brother
    Linus. Service records show that he enlisted for the duration of the war.
  • Mark* 1721-1808
    Private; of Guilford and Warren, Conn.
    [08-0040] (Job, John, John)
    He served in Capt. Nathan Chapman's Company, Col. John Mead's 9th Regiment, of drafted men in the Connecticut Militia. A pay abstract dated March 1, 1778, shows he served Jan. 10 through Feb. 2, for 28 days' pay plus "16 rations drawn at 4/96 of dollar" for a total of 2 pounds, 1 shilling, 7 pence. He was buried at Cornwall/East Cornwall, Conn.
  • Moses 1751-aft 1810
    Private; of Durham, Conn., and West Stockbridge, Mass.
    [10-0066] (Hezekiah, Joel, John, John)
    He enlisted at Richmond, Mass., for 11 days' service in 1777. His father,
    Hezekiah, and brothers Charles and Simeon also served.
  • Nathaniel*
    The DAR incorrectly lists this man who never existed; the man referred to in the member's genealogy is Nehemiah (1710-1790) of Killingworth, Conn., -- and there is no evidence that he was a soldier.
  • Nathaniel 1754-1825
    Private; of Guilford, Conn.
    [05-0657] (William, Joseph, Isaac, John, John)
    He saw 16 days' service in the
    Lexington Alarm of 1775. Discharged Oct. 17, 1775, from Capt. Andrew Ward's 2nd Company, Gen. David Wooster's Regiment, in the Northern Department. These troops to New York in late June and encamped at Harlem. Wooster and a small detachment guarded stock on Long Island that summer. In late September, the regiment marched north to take part in operations along Lakes George and Champlain. They assisted in the reduction of St. John's, Nova Scotia, in October and then were stationed at Montreal. In October and November, illness furloughed many of the soldiers. He was in Lt. Samuel Lee's Company, on an undated list of soldiers "to be stationed as a guard for the town of Guilford to beholden until Jan. 1, 1781." His brothers Amos and William also served.
  • Nehemiah 1741-1819
    Private; of Killingworth, Conn.
    [01-0115] (Nehemiah, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    The Connecticut State Library Veterans Index lists him as a private. I have no other information than that.
  • Oliver* 1734-1816
    2nd lieutenant and captain; of Bethlehem and Woodbury, Conn., and Fairfax, Vt.
    [03-0084] (Jonathan, Joshua, John, John)
    He was commissioned a 2nd lieutenant in Capt. Samuel Elmore's Company, Col. Benjamin Hinman's Regiment on May 1, 1775, and was discharged that December. This unit was ordered to secure Ft. Ticonderoga and Crown Point against recapture and took part in the operations of the Northern Department through the end of the year. I believe he may also be the "Capt. Parmelee" who served in Col. Charles Burrall's Regiment in the Northern Department under Gen. Philip Schuyler in 1776. The regiment reinforced troops besieging Quebec under Gens. Benedict Arnold and David Wooster, and after the April retreat was stationed near Ticonderoga, N.Y., where many of the men suffered from smallpox. (In his 1818 application for a pension, Cyrenius Stoddard mentions serving in Oliver's company of Burrell's Regiment; in the application of the widow of another man in the regiment, James Austin, Oliver is also mentioned.) A July 7, 1778, commissary account shows that Oliver was paid 14 pounds, 8 shillings and 8 pence, specie value of 4 pounds, 12 shillings and 5 pence, for arms furnished to his company. See his son,
    Oliver. He was buried at Fairfax's Plains Cemetery.
  • Oliver 1747/48-1821
    Lieutenant; Killingworth, Conn., and Claremont, N.H.
    Tentative [01-0130] (Ezra, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    An "Oliver Parmely" listed in 1776 as a lieutenant in Maj. William Hart's 1st Regiment of Light Horse under Col. Gold Selleck Silliman. No hometowns are given for any of the men in the regiment but Hart was from nearby Saybrook. The April 28, 1777, (page 3) and April 21, 1778, (page 1) editions of the Hartford Courrant have horses for sale by Oliver.
  • Oliver 1763-1824
    Private; of Woodbury and Bethlehem, Conn., and Benson, Vt.
    [03-0178] (Oliver, Jonathan, Joshua, John, John)
    Col. Samuel Canfield's militia regiment for 1781 at West Point, N.Y., includes an "Oliver Parmerlee" who is this man or his father,
    Oliver. It seems unlikely that the older man would have served in a militia this late in the war without rank after being a 2nd lieutenant and captain for several campaigns, and yet this private is not listed as a "Jr." He was buried at Benson's Old Cemetery.
  • Phineas* 1738/39-1782
    Private; of Guilford and Durham, Conn.
    [05-0229] (Isaac, Isaac, John, John)
    His name appears on a June 11, 1776, payroll at New Haven for Capt. Daniel Hand's Company, Col. Mathew Talcott's Regiment. It shows he enlisted March 22 and was discharged April 18. For 25 days' service in "the New York expedition," he was paid 1 pound, 16 shillings. He was the father of Constant, James and Phineas.
  • Phineas 1759-1816
    Captain; of Guilford, Conn., and Bergen, N.Y.
    [05-0927] (Phineas, Isaac, Isaac, John, John)
    He was involved in the Battles of Trenton and Princeton, N.J., over the holidays in 1776 and '77 serving in Capt. Jehiel Meigs' Company, Adj. Gen. Andrew Ward's Regiment, according to pension papers. This regiment was raised in Connecticut to serve for one year from May 14, 1776. These troops joined Gen. George Washington's army in New York in August and were first stationed near Ft. Lee. They marched to White Plains, N.Y., and subsequently into New Jersey. One of Phineas' fellow soldiers, Gilead Bradly, testified that the night after the American victory at Trenton the two "were called into the officers' quarters and the woman of the house where we put that night came in and brought us a basin of soup and says to the aforesaid Phineas Parmelee and myself, 'You look like two poor, little, moth-eaten boys. Take this soup and drink it; it will do you good.' We took it and was exceedingly glad of it." He was the son of Phineas and the brother of Constant and James. His widow, Rachael, applied for a widow's pension. He was buried at Bergen's Mount Rest Cemetery.
  • Phineas
    Armorer
    Unplaced; he may be one of the two men above, or possibly Phineas, 1734-1880 [10-0055] (John, Joel, John, John) of Durham and East Haddam.
    He made and repaired firearms in Gen. David Wooster's Regiment from July 1 to Nov. 30, 1775. This unit was recruited in New Haven County and marched to New York in late June, camping at Harlem. In late September they marched to the Northern Department and took part in operations along Lakes George and Champlain. They assisted in the reduction at St. John's, Nova Scotia, in October and then were stationed in part at Montreal. Many soldiers were furloughed or mustered out in October and November because of sickness.
  • Reuben* 1741-1810
    Sergeant in the Coast Guard; of Guilford, Conn., and West Bloomfield, N.Y.
    [02-0052] (John, John, John, John, John)
    His name appears on a roll for Capt. (Edward?) Shipman's Company dated Sept. 23, 1777, as being wounded on Sept. 19. His name is also on a payroll of Capt. Peter Vaill's Company of Guards, being stationed at Guilford "for defense of the sea coast." He was paid 20 pounds, 16 shillings, 3 pence for service from April 10, 1781 to Jan. 1, 1782. His house still stands in the Nut Plains section of Guilford. Brothers Eber, Joel and John also served, as did his father, John. He was buried at West Bloomfield's Pioneer Cemetery.
  • Roswell* 1739-1811
    Lieutenant; of Killingworth, Conn., and Leroy, N.Y.
    [01-0114] (Nehemiah, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    He was buried at Ft. Hill Cemetery off Parmelee Road at Le Roy. He also saw service in the French & Indian War. The town of LeRoy has erected a marker in his honor at the cemetery.
  • Rufus 1755-1777
    Private; of Guilford, Conn., and Richmond, Mass.
    [05-0288] (Aaron, Abraham, Isaac, John, John)
    A payroll for July 8-28, 1777, shows that he was a private in Capt. Amos Rathbun's Company, Maj. Caleb Hyde's Detachment, from Berkshire County, Mass., and paid 17 shillings, 6 pence for 13 days' service. "Died by a shot in his Breast at the Battle of Bennington in Defense of his Country, Aug. 16, 1777, in 22d yr." His brother Aaron also served.
  • Samuel* 1737-1807
    Captain; of Guilford, Conn.
    [05-0185] (Joseph, Isaac, John, John)
    He was in Capt. Elias Dunning's 5th Company in the 13th Regiment of the Connecticut Militia. He served from Aug. 12 to Sept. 30, 1776. Timothy Seward, in his 1833 pension application,:mentioned Samuel: "After the British took New York, the militia company to which I belonged, was drafted and marched directly for New York and we encamped near Ft. Washington, from thence we were marched to Valentine's Hill, and from thence to White Plains, where we had an engagement with the enemy and there remained until the company returned to New York. We were then marched to North Castle [N.Y.] and were verbally discharged. I belonged to and served in Capt. Samuel Parmelee's company. ... Gen. [Rufus] Putnam was there and Gen. Washington, and I well remember seeing Gen. Washington standing in front of the line when the enemy was firing cannon at us. ..." Also in that company was a nephew, William. In a March 19, 1777, payroll at Woodbury, Conn., for that 1 month, 18 days of service, he was paid 3 pounds, 16 shillings, 5 pence and, for 200 miles travel, 16 shillings, 8 pence. Seward's pension papers also state Samuel served again, in April, 1777: "When the enemy burnt the public stores at Danbury, the militia was called upon and we went from Guilford to Fairfield and returned by way of Redding, in search of Tories. We succeeded in taking eight or 10 suspicious persons one night. One of them, named Griswold, proved to be a traitor, and was hanged. I was in service at this time as a private soldier, six days under command of Capt. Samuel Parmelee." Samuel, a silversmith whose works are displayed in The Attic.
  • Samuel 1743-1808
    No rank; of Killingworth, Conn.
    [01-0128] (Ezra, Nathaniel, Nathaniel, John, John)
    He served in Capt. Bezeliel Bristol's Company at the Alarm at East Haven on July 5, 1779. Brothers Daniel, Ezra, Elias and Hiel also served. He was buried at Killingworth's Chestnut Hill Cemetery. His home still stands.
  • Simeon* 1740-1820
    Sergeant; of Durham, Conn., West Stockbridge, Mass., and Pittsford and Westford, Vt.
    [10-0062] (Hezekiah, Joel, John, John)
    A veteran of the French & Indian War, he enlisted as a private in the Continental Army and was made an orderly sergeant. He participated in the 1775 American invasion of Canada and was present at the capture of St. John's, Nova Scotia, in September, 1775, and Montreal on Nov. 13, 1775. He was a sergeant in Montgomery's Company in the retreat from Canada on Lake Champlain and the Sorel River to Crown Point, N.Y., where he, like many in his company, was stricken with smallpox. He also appears as a sergeant in Porter's Regiment of the Massachusetts Militia on an undated muster roll; it says he enlisted March 7, 1776. He is buried in Westford's Brookside Cemetery. His father, Hezekiah, and brothers Charles and Moses also served.
  • Simeon 1746-1806
    Private; of Guilford and New Haven, Conn.
    [08-0119] (Hezekiah, Job, John, John)
    He is listed as serving under Capt. Noah Fowler for four days after the Lexington Alarm.
  • Simeon 1755-1776
    Private; of Killingworth
    [01-0090] (Hezekiah, Job, John, John)
    "Simon Parmele" is on a 1776 roster of men in Capt. Aaron Stevens' Company, Col. Samuel Mott's Regiment, from Killingworth but there is no member of the family at the time with that name. This unit was raised midyear to reinforce Continental troops at Ft. Ticonderoga and the vicinity and returned in November. Simeon died the following month at Killingworth.
  • Solomon aft 1747-1777
    Private; of Litchfield, Conn.
    [03-0078] (David, Joshua, John, John)
    He and a nephew, John, were both on a list of men in Col. Philip Burr Bradley's Regiment, Capt. Bezeliel Bebee's Company out of Litchfield, who were taken prisoner when Ft. Washington fell to the enemy. He was held aboard a prison ship in New York Harbor. In a Dec. 26, 1776, account of prisoners, Bebee says that Solomon "went on board the ship and I fear he is drowned as I cannot find him." An inventory of his estate was made on the following April 19.
  • Stanley
    Private
    unplaced
    He was a member of Capt. Adonijah Burr's Company for two months, in Col. Increase Mosley Jr.'s Detachment, Connecticut militia. A muster roll for July 19-Aug. 1, 1778, taken at Ft. Arnold shows that he arrived in camp July 20. The fort was renamed Fort Clinton in 1780 after Gen. Benedict Arnold's desertion to the British.
  • Theodore* 1751-1824
    Captain; of Goshen, Conn.
    [05-0259] (Abraham, Abraham, Isaac, John, John)
    He served in the 5th Regiment of Connecticut, Light Horse. He can be found on an August, 1777, muster roll as a corporal commanded by Maj. Thomas Bull; he is a sergeant on a payroll of Seymour's troops in Gen. Walcott's brigade of volunteers for rations and expenses while in service in 1777; and he is a lieutenant on a muster roll of Capt. Seymour's troop of horse in Maj. Bull's regiment of dragoons in 1778. As captain, he served under Maj. Elisha Sheldon. He was present at the Surrender of Burgoyne on Oct. 17, 1777, at Saratoga, N.Y. According to a grandson, at one time Theodore was sent with a scouting party near enemy lines when he was suddenly surrounded; he drove through the enemy, warding off several blows to the head and escaped unharmed. His father, Abraham, was commended by the DAR for "patriotic service." Theodore was buried at East Street Cemetery, Goshen.
  • Thomas* 1742-1827
    Corporal/sergeant; of Litchfield, Woodbury and Washington, Conn., and Clinton, N.Y.
    [08-0127] (Thomas, Job, John, John)
    He pensioned as a sergeant in Capt. David Judson's Company in the Connecticut Militia. His pension application was returned by the district court for Connecticut and then submitted to the House of Representatives where it was resolved on March 17, 1796, that he should receive 1/8th of a sergeant's pension, an annual stipend of $7.50. He was wounded by a musket shot in the right thigh April, 27, 1777, at the Raid on Ridgefield, Conn. His was buried at Clinton's Old Burying Ground.
  • William 1752-1835
    Private; of Guilford, Conn.
    [05-0656] (William, Joseph, Isaac, John, John)
    Timothy Seward filed for a pension in 1833. William swore that he served with Seward in 1776. From Seward's account of the unit: "After the British took New York, the militia company to which I belonged, was drafted and marched directly for New York and we encamped near Ft. Washington, from thence we were marched to Valentine's Hill, and from thence to White Plains, where we had an engagement with the enemy and there remained until the company returned to New York. We were then marched to North Castle [N.Y.] and were verbally discharged. I belonged to and served in Capt. Samuel Parmelee's company. ... Gen. [Rufus] Putnam was there [at White Plains] and Gen. [George] Washington, and I well remember seeing Gen. Washington standing in front of the line when the enemy was firing cannon at us. ..." William's brothers Amos and Nathaniel also saw service during the war. Samuel is their uncle.


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