THE ATTIC

1825 LETTER
Eliza Ann (Pleasants) Parmly 1799-1891
Wife of Dr. Jehiel Parmly 1799-1873
Eleazer, Jehiel, Stephen, Stephen, John, John
I surmise that "Parmlyville" was the name of the family home outside Perry, Ohio, as there is no town in the Buckeye State by that name. Eliza is writing to the Rev. Soloman Brown, 11 Park Place, New York City; this is the address at which her brother-in-law Eleazer [1797-1874] lived and practiced at for several decades; Brown isn't a relative as far as I know.

Parmlyville, [Ohio,] July 28th 1825

My dear friend,

I have had many light[?] and many hours of trial, but the trial of feeling I have gone through since I pasted with you are the heaviest I have ever had. You know how much we all loved our dear Father [-in-law Eleazer, 1765-1825], and can judge how our hearts were torn in coming home to find him dead [kicked by a horse on the Fourth of July.] He was buried three weeks ago, and we are all in the deepest affliction.

Poor Sam [brother-in-law Samuel Wheelock Parmly, 1806-1880] is inconsolable, and for awhile seemed in a state of derangement. His rheumatic pain set in the day after we left you and did not leave him until we arrived at Buffalo. They were as severe as when he was at first taken, and he was as helpless. We came the whole way by water as he never could have reached home.

I told Dr. Belknop I would write on my arrival, but I cannot write. Will you call and tell them the cause. Jehail's [her husband] affectionate heart is almost broken but to day he seems better. Our other friends are all in good health except my brother's wife who is dangerously ill.

I have been unwell ever since I left New York and now my head is almost distracted and my bosom is bursting with sorrow. I shall be as home about the first of Sept.

Tell them good bye and believe
--?-- your affectionate friend
E. Parmly

Will you copy the following and leave it at the office of the Evening Post:
Died at his residence Parmlyville, Ohio, Mr. Eleazer Parmly aged 59 year. As a man and a citizen his character was very unexceptional and his numerous friends and acquaintances can bear ample testimony to his worth and truly benevolent disposition.